PUSSIE POP

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vampishly:

practical uses for men

vampishly:

practical uses for men

(Source: misshealthgeek, via pizza)

— 6 minutes ago with 119353 notes
theleoisallinthemind:

Castello di Friedstein, Gotha, Germany, 1999 | photo © Massimo Listri

theleoisallinthemind:

Castello di Friedstein, Gotha, Germany, 1999 | photo © Massimo Listri

(via dankfetus)

— 9 minutes ago with 1177 notes

Alabama, Arkansas,

I do love my Ma and Pa

Not the way that I do love you

(Source: queen-of-femme)

— 16 minutes ago with 2153 notes

D/E/P/R/E/S/S/E/D/L/I/F/E/

— 17 minutes ago

iio0oii:

She Don’t Use Jelly, The Flaming Lips 
Transmissions from the Satellite Heart

"I know a girl who thinks of ghosts
She’ll make ya breakfast
She’ll make ya toast
She don’t use butter
She don’t use cheese
She don’t use jelly
Or any of these
She uses vaseline

— 19 minutes ago with 375 notes

Johnny Depp making grilled cheese sandwiches with an iron.

Johnny Depp making grilled cheese sandwiches with an iron.

(Source: goodungarbage, via magicschoolbuses)

— 20 minutes ago with 170404 notes

devon-aoki:

A Devon For All Occasions:

  • weird slut
  • farm ho
  • dark glam
  • new romantic

(via illiterategraffitix)

— 21 minutes ago with 983 notes

Happy birthday Edith Minturn Sedgwick aka Edie Sedgwick!                        (April 20th 1943 - November 16th 1971) 

"There seemed to be this almost supernatural glow to her that’s hard to describe. Literally there was an aura emanating from her, a white or blue aura. It’s as if Edie was illuminated from within. Her skin was translucent — Marilyn Monroe had that quality."

 

(Source: jeanharlows, via themadmod)

— 22 minutes ago with 267 notes

archiemcphee:

Just in time for Easter, here’s a brand new entry from the Department of Extraordinary Eggshell Artists: Polish artist Piotr Bockenheim spends countless hours using a tiny electric drill, an awesomely delicate touch, and immeasurable patience to turn goose egg shells into exquisite sculptures.

Head over to Piotr’s DeviantART gallery to view more.

[via Colossal]

(via magicschoolbuses)

— 23 minutes ago with 3143 notes
donutguts:

cavetocanvas:

Alexandre Cabanel, Birth of Venus, 1863
From the Musée d’Orsay:

The Birth of Venus was one of the great successes of the 1863 Salon where it was bought by Napoleon III for his private collection. Cabanel, a painter who received numerous awards throughout his career, at that time played an important role in teaching at the Ecole des Beaux-Arts and in running the Salon. Typical of his virtuoso technique, this painting is a perfect example of the popular and official artistic taste of the period. In the eclectic spirit of the Second Empire, he combines references to Ingres with an 18th century style of painting.
Cabanel took as his subject a famous episode from classical mythology when Venus is born of sea-foam and carried ashore. This theme, very popular in the 19th century, provided some artists with the opportunity to introduce eroticism without offending public morality, under the pretext of representing a classical subject. For Cabanel, the mythological theme is indeed a pretext for the portrayal of a nude figure, which, though idealised, is nonetheless depicted in a lascivious pose. Emile Zola denounced this ambiguity: “The goddess, drowned in a sea of milk, resembles a delicious courtesan, but not of flesh and blood – that would be indecent – but made of a sort of pink and white marzipan”. The writer was thus deploring the use of a pale, smooth and opalescent palette.
That same year, Edouard Manet’s Olympia caused a scandal. The subject of the two paintings is identical: a reclining nude. But the calm assurance with which Manet’s subject stares back at the viewer seems much more provocative than the languid pose of Cabanel’s Venus.


my favorite birth of venus

donutguts:

cavetocanvas:

Alexandre Cabanel, Birth of Venus, 1863

From the Musée d’Orsay:

The Birth of Venus was one of the great successes of the 1863 Salon where it was bought by Napoleon III for his private collection. Cabanel, a painter who received numerous awards throughout his career, at that time played an important role in teaching at the Ecole des Beaux-Arts and in running the Salon. Typical of his virtuoso technique, this painting is a perfect example of the popular and official artistic taste of the period. In the eclectic spirit of the Second Empire, he combines references to Ingres with an 18th century style of painting.

Cabanel took as his subject a famous episode from classical mythology when Venus is born of sea-foam and carried ashore. This theme, very popular in the 19th century, provided some artists with the opportunity to introduce eroticism without offending public morality, under the pretext of representing a classical subject. For Cabanel, the mythological theme is indeed a pretext for the portrayal of a nude figure, which, though idealised, is nonetheless depicted in a lascivious pose. Emile Zola denounced this ambiguity: “The goddess, drowned in a sea of milk, resembles a delicious courtesan, but not of flesh and blood – that would be indecent – but made of a sort of pink and white marzipan”. The writer was thus deploring the use of a pale, smooth and opalescent palette.

That same year, Edouard Manet’s Olympia caused a scandal. The subject of the two paintings is identical: a reclining nude. But the calm assurance with which Manet’s subject stares back at the viewer seems much more provocative than the languid pose of Cabanel’s Venus.

my favorite birth of venus

(via scowlqueen)

— 24 minutes ago with 1127 notes